handsomedogs:

Here’s my little Labrador Odie when we first got him around 8weeks old, now he’s a bouncy 1 and a bit!

handsomedogs:

Here’s my little Labrador Odie when we first got him around 8weeks old, now he’s a bouncy 1 and a bit!

Anonymous asked:

Hello! I've seen your Prince of Tennis and I was curious, where did you get the episodes ? I want to rewatch this anime so bad!

LetYourMindSoar Answer:

dressrosas:

You can download all the original episodes + the Nationals OVAs + Another Story OVAs and the first movie with this torrent. Then, the New Prince of Tennis anime is here. And if you prefer to watch them online its here. Enjoy your rewatch of this super beloved, ridiculously awesome series, my friend anon! :D

EDIT: Fixed the link for NPoT. Yay! ;D

"He forgot about you. Remember that."
- Remember this every day until it sinks in. Keep reminding yourself of this every time you are reminded of him until you realise that you deserved better. You deserve better. Remember that. (via c-oquetry)

(Source: fotzenkinder, via wholetjackdrive)

runecestershire:

nortonliterature:

fivefootshelf:

So I’ve moved into a place with a brick wall and instantly found that my no-good-backdrop-for-book-photos problem was solved.  Now the problem of finding watchable movies based on all of Shakespeare’s plays so I don’t have to read them begins. 

We think you should read them, but if you’re truly pressed for time, try the Reduced Shakespeare Company’s version. All the plays in less the time it takes to sit through a full one!

For me, a lot of the fun of reading a play is seeing a blank version of it and letting all the interpretation and nuance come from me, but since plays are meant to be watched rather than read, it can be better to watch a movie than read the text as your first encounter with the play (I used to always watch first, but by now I’ve gotten to the point where I can watch or read first and it’s just as effective).
I recommend the BBC complete Shakespeare series from the 1980s. They have all 36 plays in pretty much standard productions (few cuts, nothing fancy done with the production concepts). The sets and costumes are kind of flimsy and everything is very 1980s, the acting is great and these are great introductions to the plays as plays.
I like to use these productions as sort of springboards to introduce myself to the play, and then move on the text (more basic) and shiny fancy conceptual and truncated productions (less basic) and my understanding and interpretation of the play builds and builds. One’s relationship with a Shakespeare play can grow into quite a complex organism.
If you want a recommendation for superb production of a particular play, just say the word. There are a lot of great productions out there, and we’ve got a whole fandom going here eager to spread the fun.
Some of my very favourite Shakespeare productions I’ve seen are:
Kenneth Branagh’s Macbeth
Patrick Stewart’s Macbeth
David Tennant’s Hamlet
David Tennant’s Richard II
Ben Whishaw’s Richard II
Adrian Lester & Rory Kinnear’s Othello
Ian McKellen’s King Lear

runecestershire:

nortonliterature:

fivefootshelf:

So I’ve moved into a place with a brick wall and instantly found that my no-good-backdrop-for-book-photos problem was solved.  Now the problem of finding watchable movies based on all of Shakespeare’s plays so I don’t have to read them begins. 

We think you should read them, but if you’re truly pressed for time, try the Reduced Shakespeare Company’s version. All the plays in less the time it takes to sit through a full one!

For me, a lot of the fun of reading a play is seeing a blank version of it and letting all the interpretation and nuance come from me, but since plays are meant to be watched rather than read, it can be better to watch a movie than read the text as your first encounter with the play (I used to always watch first, but by now I’ve gotten to the point where I can watch or read first and it’s just as effective).

I recommend the BBC complete Shakespeare series from the 1980s. They have all 36 plays in pretty much standard productions (few cuts, nothing fancy done with the production concepts). The sets and costumes are kind of flimsy and everything is very 1980s, the acting is great and these are great introductions to the plays as plays.

I like to use these productions as sort of springboards to introduce myself to the play, and then move on the text (more basic) and shiny fancy conceptual and truncated productions (less basic) and my understanding and interpretation of the play builds and builds. One’s relationship with a Shakespeare play can grow into quite a complex organism.

If you want a recommendation for superb production of a particular play, just say the word. There are a lot of great productions out there, and we’ve got a whole fandom going here eager to spread the fun.

Some of my very favourite Shakespeare productions I’ve seen are:

bowties-and-flannel-on-my-guitar:

the-misadventures-of-lele:

psychogemini:

deathtasteslikechicken:

abs-gabs:

SOMEONE FINALLY SAID IT

So if a teenager is at school for roughly 8 hours, and they are doing homework for 6+ hours, and they need AT LEAST 9 HOURS OF SLEEP FOR THEIR DEVELOPING BRAINS, then they may have 0-1 hours for other activities like eating, bathing, exercise, socializing (which is actually incredibly important for emotional, mental, and physical health, as well as the development of skills vital to their future career and having healthy romantic relationships among other things), religious activities, hobbies, extra curriculars, medical care of any kind, chores (also a skill/habit development thing and required by many parents), relaxation, and family time?  Not to mention that your parents may or may not pressure you to get a job, or you might need to get one for economic reasons.

I will never not reblog this

"…but teenagers have no reason to be stressed."

I’ve adapted to the point where I start doing homework for certain classes during other classes/at lunch/delegating it to other times to make room for things. Also caffeine. I don’t think this is good but oh well.

(via carriethestorymaker)